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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Assess changing attitudes of the Irish consumer to red meat and their effect on consumption found in the catalog.

Assess changing attitudes of the Irish consumer to red meat and their effect on consumption

Joanne Whelan

Assess changing attitudes of the Irish consumer to red meat and their effect on consumption

by Joanne Whelan

  • 101 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by University College Dublin in Dublin .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Meat industry and trade -- Ireland.,
  • Consumer behavior -- Ireland.

  • Edition Notes

    Thesis (M.B.S.) - University College Dublin, 1992.

    Statementby Joanne Whelan.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii,163p. ;
    Number of Pages163
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21541537M

    A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text.   The overall aim of this paper is to show the factors that may affect consumers’ attitude towards farmed fish products. Consumers ask new products on the basis of different quality attributes: stability, safety, composition, better health effects, environment protection, ent and controversial opinions on farmed and wild fish are also explored by literature review.

    However, changing consumers preferences towards food safety (over taste) have influenced meat consumption more than for any other food products (MacBean, ). Over the last decade media coverage has highlighted health and safety scares that have affected the Irish meat industry. Consumers have become more aware of hazards.   Consequently, consumer attitudes to meat are changing: there has been a rise in the number of vegetarians, vegans and flexitarians, with more people now opting for meat-free days.

      I hope none of you are concerned that eating red will negatively impact your health (and if you are, I encourage you read more about my views on eating meat).But I realize that nutrition is only one of the factors that motivate people to limit or eliminate red meat consumption; one of the primary reasons many go vegetarian is their concern about environmental impact. In the mind of the average consumer about purchase meat, color becames synonimus with fresh red meat quality (Renerre, ). The color of fresh meat is of the most important in meat marketing science, because it is the first quality attribute seen by consumer who uses it as an indication of freshness.


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Assess changing attitudes of the Irish consumer to red meat and their effect on consumption by Joanne Whelan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Consumer awareness of meat consumption environmental impact and their willingness to reduce meat consumption, among other research questions.

No prior info given. “For each of the following lifestyle- changes, please let us know whether you think this is an effective way of combatting climate change”.Cited by:   Meat Science 36 () Consumer Attitudes to Meat Eating N.

Richardson, H. MacFie & R. Shepherd AFRC Institute of Food Research, Reading Laboratory, Earley Gate, Whiteknights Road, Reading, UK, RG6 2EF (Paper presented at the 38th ICoMST, AugustClermont-Ferrand, France) ABSTRA CT This study reports on current meat consumption in the UK Cited by:   All of the mentioned causes of the meat consumption decline have potentially impacted on consumer attitude as an intermediate effect, as exemplified in, e.g.

Richardson, Shepherd, and Elliman,Richardson, MacFie, and Shepherd, and Beardsworth and Keil,Beardsworth and Keil, A multitude of definitions of attitude is Cited by:   1.

Introduction. Accumulating evidence assumes that the acquisition and consumption of meat has shaped major parts of our human psychology and behavior (Stanford & Bunn, ), and human morality in particular (Mameli, ).Throughout the evolutionary history of human kind, food, and meat in particular, appears to have shaped mechanisms that underlie cooperative intentions and Cited by:   Eating Better (in partnership with WWF) recently carried out a YouGov survey on people’s attitudes to meat consumption (allowing us to look at change from previous surveys in and ).

Our top line insights are: Public awareness of livestock’s environmental impacts is growing. 23% more people understand the impact in than did in. University College Cork, was to determine if distinct meat consumption patterns are evident among Irish consumers.

These segments were profiled based on demographic characteristics and food choice attitudes. Segmentation is commonly used in market research to identify distinct consumer groups or segments based on similar characteristics. Rising global meat consumption is likely to have a devastating environmental impact, scientists have warned.

A new major analysis suggests meat consumption is set to climb steeply as the world. through changes in consumption, and we conducted a detailed review of consumption patterns and consumer attitudes towards food, ethical consumerism, and red meat and dairy, to develop a series of options for reducing consumption.

We evaluated these against their. In spite of their critical attitudes, the interviewees nevertheless consumed meat on a daily basis. This study suggests that negative attitudes towards meat are not necessarily associated with decreased meat consumption, but are associated with a tendency to re-structure meals with special reference to the role assigned to meat.

The new edition of this powerful and challenging book explores the impacts of the global growth in the production and consumption of meat and dairy, including cultural and health factors, and the implications of the likely intensification of farming for both small-scale producers and for animals.

Interest in meat consumption and its effect on health has grown tremendously over the past few years [1,2,3,4,5].In Australia, meat, poultry, fish and alternatives’ is one of the five core food groups, part of a balanced diet [] and provides key nutrients such as protein, long-chain omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, iron and zinc [].Although it is a diverse food group, comprising fresh meat.

The research team developed a questionnaire that would enable them to assess these beliefs and that differentiated between two aspects of the beliefs of meat-eaters, i.e., that meat consumption is. The results of a survey study (N=) show that animal health concerns (measured by the Animal Attitude Scale) can predict diet choice.

Vegetarians are most concerned, while full-time meat eaters are least concerned, and the contrast between flexitarians and vegetarians is greater than the contrast between flexitarians and full-time meat eaters. According to the results, the participants' once a week consumption frequencies of beef, mutton/lamb and goat meat were foundand %, respectively and two-three times a week.

Health consequences of red and processed meat consumption. Concerns associated with the health consequences of red and processed meat (RPM) consumption focus in particular on the emerging literature on their health effects on some cancers (,7, 8), CVD (,9, 10), obesity (,11, 12), type 2 diabetes (,13) and antibiotic resistance (,14).Some of these negative health consequences depend on.

Changing consumer food behavior is a challenge. Taste preferences, culinary traditions and social norms factor into food choices. Since behavioral change cannot occur without the subject’s positive attitude based on reasons and motivations, a total of 34 papers on consumer attitudes and behavior towards meat consumption in.

For Foscht and Swoboda (), attitudes are also a key variable in explaining consumer behaviour. According to Grunert (), most consumers have attitudes towards meat consumption, but in.

No need for 90% drop in meat consumption, says Irish professor Fact Ireland’s agriculture is mostly grassland-based is positive, says Alan Matthews Sat,   Hooked on Meat: How Cultural Beliefs and Attitudes Drive Meat Consumption; Great New Animated Video Explains the Terrible Economics of Meat Production in 3 Minutes; A New Way to Account for Taste: Tax Meat to Fight Climate Change; Each.

Red meat was the highest contributor to GHGE with g CO 2 eq arising from a mean intake of 47 g/d. Dairy and starchy staples were the next largest dietary GHGE sources, with mean daily emissions of g CO 2 eq and g CO 2 eq, respectively. The lowest emissions were associated with consumption of vegetables, fruits and legumes/pulses/nuts.

Furthermore, future research should examine whether the findings presented here may extend to attitude change as assessed using standardized measures of food-related attitudes, along with indicators of actual behavior change that may result from changes in attitudes (e.g., an increase in purchases of organic foods, decrease in meat consumption).Background.

Although beef constitutes an important part of many consumers' diets, its consumption has become a quite controversial issue. On the one hand, red meat provides essential nutrients, containing high quality protein and essential micronutrients such as vitamins A, B 6, B 12, D and E, iron, zinc and selenium, contributing to consumers' health throughout life [1,2].Current meat consumption levels impact environment and health, highlighting a need to reduce meat consumption and increase that of plant‐based alternative proteins.

There appears to be a lack of awareness amongst consumers as to how meat consumption affects health and climate change, which is likely to undermine intention to change.